This page is part of © FOTW Flags Of The World website

Club Nautique de Nice (Yacht Club, France): Members' private signals (1907)

Part 7: Regular members, L-R

Last modified: 2010-11-13 by ivan sache
Keywords: nice | private signal | lagotellerie | star (white) | stars: 3 (yellow) | star (yellow) | letters: gym (white) | star: 8 points (black) | clover leaf (green) | stars: 2 (red) | letter: o (white) |
Links: FOTW homepage | search | disclaimer and copyright | write us | mirrors



See also:


CNN regular membership

According to Article 24 of the club's statutes, the admission into CNN of a regular member (aged at least 21) required introduction by two regular members and validation by two-third of the members of the Administrative Commission, in a vote by secret ballot.
According to Article 28, the admission fee was 20 francs; the yearly subscription was 10 francs, to which was added a 20 franc contribution to race organization. Active officers of the Army and the Navy did not pay the admission fee.
According to Article 5, regular members leaving the country for at least one year could ask for a leave, during which they would not pay any subscription; when back to France, their regular membership would be fully restored.

According to Article 7, a section of the CNN could be founded in a place where at leat five regular members stay. This happened in Saint- Raphaël (6 members).

According to Article 29, members were considered as non-resident when they lived in the Department of Alpes-Maritimes for less than six months (at the time, during the winter season).

The CNN 1907 Yearbook shows the private signal of the regular members detailed in the next sections.

Ivan Sache, 20 May 2010


Maurice de Lagotellerie

[Lagotellerie's flag]

Lagotellerie's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 27 May 2010

The shipowner Maurice de Lagotellerie inherited in 1905 the Crouan company, whose flagship was the famous Belem, from his father-in-law Fernand Crouan but could not preserve the company from bankrupt, which occurred in 1906.
During the 1908-1910 French Antarctic Expedition, Jean-Baptiste Charcot mapped an island located in Marguerite Bay, Graham Land; he named it Lagotellerie Island, probably after a sponsor of the expedition, even most probably Maurice de Lagotellerie. Lagotellerie Island was erected Antarctic Specially Protected Area No. 115 on 5 August 2002 by the British Government, mostly because it harbours large stands of the plants Deschampsia antartica and Colobanthus quitensis.
Lagotellerie, admitted into the CNN in 1906, is listed as the owner of the steam yacht René (104 tons). His private signal is red with a white star, matching the house flag seemingly used by his ships in 1905-1906.

Ivan Sache, 27 May 2010


Viscount Raoul de Laire

[Laire's flag]

Laire's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 27 May 2010

Raoul de Laire defended on 21 June 1906 in Paris a thesis in medicine entitled Variations de la formule hématique sous l'action de ferments métalliques.
On 21 November 1921, Baron Raoul de Laire skipped his yacht Pierrette from Nice to Antibes. The ship wrecked at Cros-de-Cagnes; Mrs. de Laire, who escorted her husband by car, witnessed the eventand called for help the local fishers, to no avail because of the violence of the surf. Similar other events boosted the building of a rescue station, the first on the French Riviera, at Cros-de-Cagnes; founded by the Société Centrale de Sauvetage des Naufragés - the forerunner of the today's SNSM - , the station was inaugurated on 16 November 1924. The same day, the canot Marguerite, named for Raoul de Laire's daughter and patroned by the widow, was blessed. Since then, all the canots owned by the station have been named Marguerite, up to today's Marguerite VI, inaugurated on 29 April 2009.
Admitted into the CNN in 1897, Raoul de Laire is listed as the owner of the cutter Forban (8 tons). His private signal is a blue triangular flag with a yellow chevron, two yellow stars placed along the hoist and another one placed at the point of the flag.

Ivan Sache, 27 May 2010


R. Bouriat and Raoul de Laire

[Bouriat and Laire's flag]

Bouriat and Laire's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 27 May 2010

A blue flag with a yellow star in upper hoist and a white star in lower fly is shown as R. Bouriat and R. de Laire's private signal, although Bouriat is not listed among the CNN members.

Ivan Sache, 27 May 2010


Mario de Latour Saint-Ygest

[Saint-Ygest's flag]

Latour Saint-Ygest's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 27 May 2010

Mario de Latour Saint-Ygest, admitted into the CNN in 1901, was a noted poet, familar of Villiers de l'Isle-Adam, Huysmans and Mallarmé; he published several poems in La Grande Revue edited by Arsène Houssaye. His wife, Claudine (1876-1937), was the daughter of the Parnassian poet Catulle Mendès (1841-1909) and Augusta Holmès.
Wintering in the Villa du Phare in Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat, Saint- Ygest is listed as the owner of the CNN monotype Boréon (0.25 ton). His private signal is black with two blue ascending rays.

Ivan Sache, 27 May 2010


Charles Leroy

[Leroy's flag]

Leroy's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 27 May 2010

Charles Leroy, Captain in the 112th Regiment of the Line Infantry, was admitted into the CNN in 1906. His private signal is white with a red triangle charged with the white letters "GYM".

Ivan Sache, 27 May 2010


Eugène Mallet

[Mallet's flag]

Mallet's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 27 May 2010

Eugène Mallet (1840-1915), admitted in the CNN in 1897, was a French Consul living (or wintering) in the Cape of Antibes. The Malet family, a wealthy Protestant family from Rouen, moved in the 16th century to Switzerland to escape religious persecution.
Mallet is listed as the owner the cutter Marguerite (3 tons) and of the oil-powered launch Gazelle. His private signal is a blue triangular flag with a yellow disc in the middle.

Ivan Sache, 27 May 2010


André Mansuetti

[Mansuetti's flag]

Mansuetti's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 27 May 2010

André Mansuetti, from Villefranche-sur-Mer, admitted into the CNN in 1894, is listed as the owner of the cutter Thérèse II (3 tons). His private signal is white with a red chevron placed horizontally, all over the flag.

Ivan Sache, 27 May 2010


Baron Edouard von Olhoff Groote

[Olhoff's flag]

Olhoff's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 28 May 2010

Baron Edouard von Olhoff Groote, a rentier (person of private means) living in the castle of Lance, Basse-Hermalle, Oupeye (Belgium), was admitted into the CNN in 1898. His private signal is yellow with two black eight-pointed star on top of the flag and a green clover leaf in the bottom of the flag.

Ivan Sache, 28 May 2010


Antoine Olivari

[Olivari's flag]

Olivari's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 28 May 2010

Antoine Olivari, industrial, Municipal Councillor and General Councillor, admitted into the CNN in 1896, is listed as the owner of the cutter Rainette (1 ton). His private signal is blue with two thin white crescents forming a "O" and two red stars, in lower hoist and upper fly, respectively.

Ivan Sache, 28 May 2010


General Arthur Paget

[Paget's flag]

Paget's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 28 May 2010

General Sir Arthur Henry Fitzroy Paget (1851-1928), admitted into the CNN in 1896, was Colonel of the 1st Batallion, Scots Guard; Kings of Arms of the Order of the British Empire; Aide-de-Camp of King George V (1910-1914); and General Officer Commander-in-Command of the Irish Command (1912-1914).
General Paget's private signal is blue with two light blue triangles placed along the hoist

Ivan Sache, 28 May 2010


Édouard Pilatte

[Pilatte's flag]

Pilatte's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 28 May 2010

Édouard Pilatte, a doctor from Nice admitted into the CNN in 1893 and Honorary Secretary General of the club, published Lettres à une maman, causeries médicales. His signal is white with three black disks placed along the ascending diagonal.

Ivan Sache, 28 May 2010


Richard P. Pulteney

[Pulteney's flag]

Pulteney's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 28 May 2010

Richard Pulteney, from London, admitted into the CNN in 1895 and a member of the club's Administrative Committee in 1906, is listed as the owner of the lugger Peterina (1 ton). His private signal is white with a red serrated horizontal stripe in the middle.

Ivan Sache, 28 May 2010


Henri Rigaud

[Rigaud's flag]

Rigaud's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 28 May 2010

Henri Rigaud was a perfumer from Paris. He succeeded in 1902 his father Jean-Baptiste Rigaud, who had founded in 1852 a perfumery highly prized by the European courts (French Second Empire, Royal courts of Netherlands, Greece and Russia); very innovative, Rigaud introduced in Europe the "exotic" perfumes based on ylang-ylang (nicknamed "The Flower of the Flowers" or "The King of the Perfumes") and kananga. Working with her mother, under the name Veuve Rigaud, Rigaud created luxurious perfumes, such as Camia (1906) and Mary Garden (1910, named for a famous American opera singer). In 1914, Rigaud, the sole owner of the Rigaud company, launched Un Air Embaumé, sold in a bottle designed by the crystaller Lalique and placed into a coffin-shaped box wrapped with satin. One of the top perfumes for the next three decades, Un Air Embaumé was "hijacked" in 1921 by Marcel Duchamp and Man Ray into an "assisted" ready-made; purchased by Yves Saint-Laurent and Pierre Bergé in 1990, the ready-made was sold for 8,913,000 € in February 2009. Other famous Rigaud's creations are Chypre de Rigaud, Un Rêve, Parfum Tendre and Vers la Joie. He died in 1925 and was succeeded by Gustave Delage, the guardians of Rigaud's children. Still in business, the Rigaud company is now specialized in perfumed candles.

Admitted into the CNN in 1905, Rigaud is listed as the co-owner, together with Paul Chauchard, of the cutter Guibel (2.5 tons). Rigaud's private signal is horizontally divided white-red (1:2).

Ivan Sache, 25 May 2010