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Carmarthenshire (Wales)

Last modified: 2019-12-07 by rob raeside
Keywords: carmarthenshire | wales |
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Carmarthenshire County Council Flag

[Carmarthenshire Local Government Area, Wales] image by Klaus-Michael Schneider, 4 October 2019

Carmarthenshire (Welsh: Sir Gaerfyrddin or informally Sir Gâr) had no proper flag but its local council in 2014 had a logo flag as follows:
The flag is white displaying a sinister facing red dragon without feet with a long tail, shaped like a sine curve, his wing is parted of blue over green over red. The flag has an inscription as follows: “Carmarthenshire” (red, interrupting the tail), “Sir Gâr” (green above the red inscription and slightly bigger), “Cyngor” and “County Council” (both blue, embowed and alongside the dragon’s tail).

Source: I spotted this flag on 12 September 2014 in Carmarthen (Welsh: Caerfyrddin)
(Gaerfyrddin is a mutation of Caerfyrddin)
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 4 October 2019

It is remarkable that according to Jason Saber a flag of Caernarfonshire had been registered in 2012, years after the abolishment of that county. This flag also was still in use in 2014.
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 4 October 2019


Carmarthen (town)

[Carmarthen, Wales] image by Klaus-Michael Schneider, 5 October 2019

Town of Carmarthen (Welsh: Caerfyrrdin)
The town had no proper flag in 2014 but the local county issued pentagonal table banners (rectangle plus triangle in base), the size without fringes and tassels was approx. 15 cm x 25 cm. The banner was white with yellow tassels and fringes displaying the local greater arms. In black initials the Welsh name was placed above the arms and the English name beneath.
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 5 October 2019

Town of Carmarthen (Welsh: Caerfyrrdin)
The design is officially described:
Gules, a castle triple tower between two ostrich feathers erect in fess Argent, on each of the outer towers a Cornish Chough proper, respecting the centre tower, and in base a lion passant reguardant Or. And for the Crest on a wreath of colours a fisherman carrying a Coracle proper. The scroll displays the motto “Rhyddid Hedd a Llwyddiant” (English: “Freedom, Peace and Prosperity”)
The Coat of Arms was granted to the Borough (Welsh: Fwrdeistref) by the College of Heralds on 9 April 1936 based on the original 16th century Seal of the Borough. As will be seen from the illustrations, the central portion of the crest is based on the original Seal, the coracle, a light rowing boat made of leather and trellis, man is a comparatively modern addition. An interesting detail concerns the position of the two birds, traditionally regarded as the ravens of Sir Rhys ap Thomas of Dynevor, now officially described as Cornish choughs. On the state Sword and Mayor's Chain they face outwards and on the Maces and Coat of Arms they face inwards.
Source: town's information leaflet
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 11 November 2019