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Pansexuality Flag

Last modified: 2020-06-04 by randy young
Keywords: sexual orientation | pansexuality | omnisexuality | tricolor: horizontal tricolor (pink-yellow-blue) |
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[Pansexuality flag]
image by Tomislav Todorović, 24 February 2020

See also:

Pansexuality flag

Here is a flag for the sexual orientation of "pansexualism." I don't really know what pansexualism is.
Elias Granqvist, 9 December 2012

According to the Oxford Online Dictionary, here's the definition of "pansexual":
adjective
    not limited or inhibited in sexual choice with regard to gender or activity.
noun
    a pansexual person.

From Wikipedia:
Pansexuality, or omnisexuality, is sexual attraction, sexual desire, romantic love, or emotional attraction toward persons of all gender identities and biological sexes.

Etymology of the word:
The prefix pan- comes from an Ancient Greek term meaning "all" or "every." Omni- comes from a Latin term meaning "all." "Pansexual" is derived from the word "pansexualism," dated back to 1917, which is the view "that the sex instinct plays the primary part in all human activity, mental and physical." Credited to Sigmund Freud, it is a term of reproach leveled at early psychology, and is also defined as "the pervasion of all conduct and experience with sexual emotions."

Esteban Rivera, 9 December 2012

I think it is not just another term for bisexual, someone who is attracted to other people regardless of their gender or sexual orientation, but refers to somebody who is open to a much wider variety of sexual activities than normal, and not just with male and female.
Pete Loeser, 9 December 2012

It most certainly well isn't. A bisexual is potentialy attracted to both genders; a pansexual is potentialy attracted to anyone regardless of gender or gender identity (thus including transgender, genderqueer, hermaphrodite, transvestite and androgynous).
Marc Pasquin, 10 December 2012

Pansexuality, also called omnisexuality, means the sexual, romantic or emotional attraction towards people of any sex or gender identity ("gender-blind" sexuality) [1]. The flag representing it [1] is a pink-yellow-blue tricolor, which is supposed to represent all genders: pink color stands for females, blue for males, and yellow for non-binary (e.g. androgynous, agender, bigender, genderfluid, transgender, intersex) people. The color shades are deep pink (much like the "hot pink" form Gilbert Baker's flag, or even deeper), light blue (close to FOTW color B--, just a bit darker), and yellow is usually darker than FOTW color Y, but still visibly lighter than Y+. The ratio generally varies between 2:3 and 3:5, but the latter seems to clearly prevail. The flag design was present online since the early 2010s, but seems to came into the real-life use only in later part of the decade. A list of examples for its use follows:

In all of the above examples, the flag was used with pink at the top at blue at the bottom. However, there are several recent examples of reversed color order, as was done in Denver, Colorado on 13 February 2019 during a rally before the Colorado State Capitol supporting the bill to ban LGBT-conversion therapy for minors [24]. That was repeated at the Capital Pride Parade 2019 in Washington, DC [25]. In the UK, it was seen at the Brighton Pride 2019 [26]. Still these examples seem to be too few to allow for the flag to be described already as having "no right side up."
Tomislav Todorović, 24 February 2020
Sources:
[1] — Heavy.com website
[2] — Wikimedia Commons - Photo from Capital Pride Parade 2016, Washington, DC on 11 June 2016
[3] — Wikimedia Commons - Photo from Capital Pride Parade 2018, Washington, DC on 9 June 2018
[4] — Wikimedia Commons - Photo from Capital Pride Parade 2018, Washington, DC on 9 June 2018
[5] — Wikimedia Commons - Photo from Capital Pride Parade 2018, Washington, DC on 9 June 2018
[6] — Flickr - Photo from Erie Pride, on 24 June 2017
[7] — Flickr - Photo from Erie Pride, on 24 June 2017
[8] — Flickr - Photo from Erie Pride, on 24 June 2017
[9] — Flickr - Photo from Milano Pride, on 24 June 2017
[10] — Flickr - Photo from Milano Pride, on 24 June 2017
[11] — Flickr - Photo from Milano Pride, on 24 June 2017
[12] — Wikimedia Commons - Photo from Paris Pride, on 24 June 2017
[13] — Flickr - Photo from Bourne Free, Bournemouth, England, on 1 July 2017
[14] — Wikimedia Commons - Photo from London Pride, on 8 July 2017
[15] — Wikimedia Commons - Photo from Atlanta Gay Pride, on 15 October 2017
[16] — Wikimedia Commons - Photo from EuroPride 2018, Stockholm, on 4 August 2018
[17] — Wikimedia Commons - Photo from Christopher Street Day Berlin, on 2 July 2018
[18] — Wikimedia Commons - Photo from Christopher Street Day Berlin, on 27 July 2019
[19] — Wikimedia Commons - Photo from Christopher Street Day Berlin, on 27 July 2019
[20] — Wikimedia Commons - Photo from New York Pride Parade, on 30 June 2019
[21] — Wikimedia Commons - Photo from New York Pride Parade, on 30 June 2019
[22] — Wikimedia Commons - Photo from Christopher Street Day Cologne, on 7 July 2019
[23] — Wikimedia Commons - Photo from Taiwan Pride, on 26 October 2019
[24] — The Colorado Independent website
[25] — Wikimedia Commons - Photo from Capital Pride Parade 2019, Washington, DC on 8 June 2019
[26] — Flickr - Photo from Brighton Pride, on 3 August 2019