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Glendale, Arizona (U.S.)

Maricopa County

Last modified: 2019-07-17 by rick wyatt
Keywords: glendale | arizona | maricopa county |
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[Flag of Glendale, Arizona] 2:3, 5:8 image(s) by permission of David B. Martucci
image(s) from American City Flags, Raven 9-10 (2002-2003), courtesy of the North American Vexillological Association, which retains copyright.



See also:


Current Flag

Text and image(s) from American City Flags, Raven 9-10 (2002-2003), courtesy of the North American Vexillological Association, which retains copyright. Image(s) from American City Flags by permission of David B. Martucci.

Design

Glendale’s flag places the city logo on a white field. The logo incorporates lettering below three stylized, overlapping shapes representing pillars. The lettering reads GLENDALE in a Times Roman-style font in teal (turquoise), except the A joins with a Z below it, in a script-like font in copper, representing “Arizona”. Parts of the A and Z overlap the adjoining letters. The pillar shapes, all copper-colored, are each a rectangle divided into quadrants just above its horizontal center, with a circular section (whose diameter is one-half the width of the rectangle) centered around the quadrants’ intersection point removed and one of the two lower quadrants removed. On a field of 4 by 6 units, the teal lettering extends 4.2 units wide and 0.6 units high. The pillars range from 1 unit wide and 1.25 units high to .75 units wide and .85 units high. The largest pillar is in the center; the others flank and overlap it on the left and right. The copper and teal colors are officially PMS 173c (876) and PMS 328.
Ted Kaye, American City Flags, Raven 9-10, 2002-2003

Symbolism

According to the city:
In 1990 a new contemporary logo was designed and officially adopted for use by the city. The new logo replaced the city seal and is characterized by three stylistic pillars adapted from a strong architectural element in city hall … The purpose of the logo was to provide a symbol and combination of color that can be easily identified by both citizens and businesses. The pillars represent three key elements of community—the citizens, the business sector, and the government that serves them.
Turquoise and copper are the city’s colors. Turquoise may represent the gemstone common in the area and frequently used in local jewelry; copper may represent the mineral wealth of the region.
Ted Kaye, American City Flags, Raven 9-10, 2002-2003

Selection

The flag and logo were developed and adopted in anticipation of the 1991 centennial of the founding of Glendale.
Flag adopted: 1990 (official).
Ted Kaye, American City Flags, Raven 9-10, 2002-2003

Designer

The Marketing and Communications Department of the city, with help from an outside firm.
Ted Kaye, American City Flags, Raven 9-10, 2002-2003

More about the Flag

The Glendale city warehouse orders about 8 flags every year in 4 by 6 feet and 5 by 8 feet sizes. The flag flies on one of three poles in front of the city office building. In order to ensure preservation of its flags for future generations, the city donated full-size versions of the current and former flags to the Glendale Historical Society in 1998.
Ted Kaye, American City Flags, Raven 9-10, 2002-2003


Seal

[City seal] image located by Paul Bassinson, 17 April 2019

Source: http://i1.wp.com/az-locksmith.com/
Paul Bassinson, 17 April 2019


Former flag

[Flag of Glendale, Arizona] 2:3 image(s) by permission of David B. Martucci
image(s) from American City Flags, Raven 9-10 (2002-2003), courtesy of the North American Vexillological Association, which retains copyright.

Glendale’s previous flag bears the city seal approved by ordinance #1083 on June 12, 1979. The seal is depicted in copper, centered on a white background, with a diameter of 2.5 units on a field of 4 by 6 units. According to city code, "The city seal shall be of circular design. Across the top portion the word “Glendale” is shown. The word “Arizona” is across the bottom portion. Off center to the left on the inside of the seal is an outline map of the state. Across the same portion is a silhouette of a “family” looking over the horizon, the city, and its surroundings. The rays emanate from the center of the city upward. Below the family is shown the date of incorporation (1910)."
(Code 1963, § 1-6) Design One/Attention Getters, represented by Don Hasulak, designed the seal.

The city’s original seal, adopted when Glendale was incorporated on June 18, 1910, featured a sugar beet to honor the engine of local economic recovery after the disastrous 1895 flood, the beet sugar factory built in 1906.
Ted Kaye, American City Flags, Raven 9-10, 2002-2003