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Super Bowl Flags (U.S.)

National Football League, NFL

Last modified: 2020-02-05 by rick wyatt
Keywords: united states | football |
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National Football League Logo

   image from Pete Loeser, 20 December 2016


See also:

Introduction: National Football League Super Bowl

     The professional organization for American football is called the National Football League (NFL). The NFL was formed in 1920 as the American Professional Football Association (APFA), but in 1922 was renamed the National Football League. Between 1966 and 1970, the NFL merged with the fledgling American Football League (AFL), which had been established to add new football franchises for other cities in the United States and allow these franchises time to build up teams strong enough to compete with the established NFL teams. Today the NFL is divided between the National Football Conference (NFC) and the American Football Conference (AFC). In 1966 a new championship game was established to determine the best team of the year between the two conferences. It was named the Super Bowl and has become an event held yearly each February since that time.
     Note: The flags illustrated on this page are the Generic Super Bowl Flags approved by the NFL that do not commemorate any individual teams competing in the Super Bowl. Those flags will be found on the individual team pages. Also be aware that there are a host of manufacturer's variants of these and other fan flags being marketed for "Bills" fans. This includes garden flags, banners, and pennants.
Pete Loeser, 20 December 2016

Variant 50-year Commemorative NFL Logos used on Flags

Red/Gold/Blue    Blue/Gold
images from Pete Loeser, 20 December 2016

These variant gold colored logos have been used on 50 year team commemorative flags approved by the NFL.
Pete Loeser, 20 December 2016


Generic Super Bowl Flags

Super Bowl 45 (XLV) 2011

  image from Pete Loeser, 20 December 2016

Super Bowl XLV was held February 6, 2011 at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas. The Pittsburgh Steelers beat the Green Bay Packers by a score of 31-25.
Pete Loeser, 20 December 2016


Super Bowl 46 (XLVI) 2012

  image from Pete Loeser, 20 December 2016

Super Bowl XLVI was held February 5, 2012 at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana. The New York Giants beat the New England Patriots by a score of 21-17.
Pete Loeser, 20 December 2016


Super Bowl 47 (XLVII) 2013

  image from Pete Loeser, 20 December 2016

Super Bowl XLVII was held February 3, 2013 at The Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. The Baltimore Ravens beat the San Francisco 49ers by a score of 34-31.
Pete Loeser, 20 December 2016


Super Bowl 48 (XLVIII) 2014

  image from Pete Loeser, 20 December 2016

Super Bowl XLVIII was held February 2, 2014 at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey. The Seattle Seahawks beat the Denver Broncos by a score of 43-8.
Pete Loeser, 20 December 2016


Super Bowl 49 (XLIX) 2015

  image from Pete Loeser, 20 December 2016

Super Bowl XLIX was held February 1, 2015 at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Arizona. The New England Patriots beat the Seattle Seahawks by a score of 28-24.
Pete Loeser, 20 December 2016


Super Bowl 50 (L) 2016

  image from Pete Loeser, 20 December 2016

Super Bowl L was held February 7, 2016 at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, California. The Denver Broncos beat the Carolina Panthers by a score of 24-10.
Pete Loeser, 20 December 2016


Super Bowl 51 (LI) 2017

  image from Pete Loeser, 24 January 2020

Super Bowl LI was played at the NRG Stadium in Houston, Texas, on February 5, 2017, to determine the championship of the National Football League for the 2016 season. The American Football Conference champion New England Patriots defeated the National Football Conference champion Atlanta Falcons, 34-28 in overtime. The Patriots' 25-point comeback is the largest comeback in Super Bowl history, and Super Bowl LI was the first to be decided in overtime.
Pete Loeser, 24 January 2020


Super Bowl 52 (LII) 2018

  image from Pete Loeser, 24 January 2020

Super Bowl LII was held February 4, 2018, at the U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The National Football Conference champion Philadelphia Eagles defeated the powerhouse American Football Conference champion New England Patriots, 41-33, to win their first Super Bowl. The upset victory of the defending Patriots by the underdogs Eagles was not expected.
Pete Loeser, 24 January 2020


Super Bowl 53 (LIII) 2019

  image from Pete Loeser, 24 January 2020

Super Bowl LIII determined the championship of the National Football League for the 2018 season. The American Football Conference champion New England Patriots defeated the National Football Conference champion Los Angeles Rams, 13-3. The game was played on February 3, 2019, at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia.
Pete Loeser, 24 January 2020


Super Bowl 54 (LIV) 2020

  image from Pete Loeser, 24 January 2020

Super Bowl LIV determined the champion of the National Football League for the 2019 season and marked the 100th season for the NFL. The American Football Conference champion Kansas City Chiefs defeated the National Football Conference champion San Francisco 49ers 31-20. The game was held on Sunday, Feburary 5, 2020, at the Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida.
Pete Loeser, 8 February 2020


Teams Competing for the Super Bowl Championship

There are 32 teams in the NFL competing for the Super Bowl Championship each year. Any flags commemorating individual team Super Bowl victories will be found on the individual pages linked below.

AFC West
AFC North
AFC East
AFC South
NFC West
NFC North
NFC East
NFC South
Denver
Broncos
Baltimore
Ravens
Buffalo
Bills
Houston
Texans
Arizona
Cardinals
Chicago
Bears
Dallas
Cowboys
Atlanta
Falcons
Kansas City
Chiefs
Cincinnati
Bengals
Indianapolis
Colts
Los Angeles
Rams
Detroit
Lions
New York
Giants
Carolina
Panthers
Oakland
Raiders
Cleveland
Browns
New England
Patriots
Jacksonville
Jaguars
San Francisco
49ers
Green Bay
Packers
Philadelphia
Eagles
New Orleans
Saints
Los Angles
Chargers
Pittsburgh
Steelers
New York
Jets
Tennessee
Titans
Seattle
Seahawks
Minnesota
Vikings
Washington
Redskins
Tampa Bay
Buccaneers

Note: The "Houston Oilers" are now playing as the Tennessee Titans and have been replaced in Houston by the AFC expansion team - the Houston Texans.